Engineered Systems Magazine

Fire detectors: Gamewell-FCI

May 21, 2012

Gamewell-052112-body.jpgGamewell-FCI introduces a new fire/CO detector as cost-effective solution for new CO laws.

Gamewell-FCI by Honeywell (NYSE: HON)has released the multi-criteria fire and CO (carbon monoxide) detector, which incorporates four sensing elements in one cost-effective unit to quickly detect smoke, CO, flame and heat, verifying a true emergency and deterring false alarms. The new 4-Warn/CO detector’s advanced addressable sensing technology meets new CO detection legislation adopted by nearly all 50 states. When used with Gamewell-FCI’s B200S sounder base, the 4-Warn/CO detector can reduce required detection upgrade costs by as much as 54%.

With each U.S. state adopting its own versions of the 2012 editions of IFC (International Fire Code) and IBC (International Building Code), many residential and institutional buildings are being required to add or upgrade CO detection. Hotels, dormitories, apartment buildings, hospitals and nursing homes top the list of affected facilities.

The traditional method of wiring and installing separate photo and CO detectors, together with the required base, mini-horn, monitor module, conduit and junction box, can cost hundreds of dollars per room. Up to 54% of these material and labor costs can be eliminated by installing the 4-Warn/CO detector and its addressable sounder base. Plus, less devices and wire present a cleaner appearance.

Facilities plagued by nuisance alarms can benefit from this new device’s four sensing elements for smoke, CO, flame and heat to validate a real emergency and negate false alarms. 

As part of an E3 Series® fire alarm and emergency communications system from Gamewell-FCI, local audio signals from the new detector’s B200S sounder base can be automatically silenced when live and pre-recorded emergency communications are delivered via the main system. Exclusive to E3 Series systems and 4-Warn/CO B200S sounder bases, this one-of-a-kind silencing feature eliminates the common emergency communications intelligibility issues caused by multiple audible alerts sounding simultaneously.